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-   -   Wanting quiet without water! (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/cooling-and-temperature-monitoring/5614-wanting-quiet-without-water.html)

superally 23rd May, 2002 05:22 PM

Wanting quiet without water!
 
Hi folks

Bit new at this game and looking for some advice. I'm trying to make my PC as quiet as possible - not worried about oc'ing; it's fast enough for my needs (upgraded to XP1700 / k7s5a, Radeon 7500, 256MB SDRAM) but too damn noisy.

I've installed a new PSU from QuietPC (www.quietpc.com) and got a fair bit of an improvement, so I'm guessing the next thing to go at are the two other fans in the system - one on the Radeon 7500 and the other on the Athlon XP1700. Two questions therefore:

- anyone successfully used the Zalman passive videocard heatsink on a Radeon 7500 (or anything that runs similarly hot)? Zalman

- same question really for the Zalman Flower heatsink / 92mm fan combo (Flower ?

Also very grateful for any dire warnings or other suggestions for getting this thing to quieten down a bit!

Thanks again

Ally

Random Nonsense 23rd May, 2002 05:40 PM

For quiet and cool use a thermalright AX-7 and a quiet 80mm fan, Pabst fans are extremely quiet!

the cooler on the graphics card is more tricky, since small fans are inherently "whiney". Using one of those zalman sinks might be ok, but i would want something a fair bit more meaty than that!

Kaitain 24th May, 2002 12:05 PM

You can also use other tricks like using sound insulation. Get sheets of 1/2" thick neoprene foam and evostick it to the inside edges of your case, instantly blocking out a fair amount of the noise.

Marrying larger diameter, slower spinning fans onto heatsinks (eg ducting a slow 120mm fan onto the cpu) give you the same cooling ability as a delta screamer... but no noise.

Passive coolers such as the Zalman are fine for short-term running of computers, but probably aren't suitable for a 24/7 folding rig. You'll be fine with one if spending the odd evening playing Counterstrike is what you want to do with the computer...

loop 24th May, 2002 03:12 PM

My brother runs all standard cooling stuff pretty much, but to get the quiet we just put the PC in a cupboard.

It folds 24/7 and the temps never go much higher than 50.
This is with only a standard cpu fan and a PSU fan running at 5 volts.

Thats another thing. To make your PSU even quieter you can convert the fan to 5 or 7 volts. Simply open up the power supply and snip the wires for the fan off the chipboard (most actually use a connector so you dont have to do any snipping) and run the wires out of the PSU and into a HDD power connecter. Connect the black wire to red of the connector and red wire to yellow one and you get 7volts, or black on black and red on red for 5volts.

Done this on lots of PSUs and they all seem quite happy with the less cooling. I dont think I need to mention that this invalidates your warranty though.

For extra neatness you can solder the two fan wires to the 5 and 12 volt lines on your PSU's chipboard. This is a little more risky but I've done it a few times and it does make the thing a lot neater and more permanent.

JayJay 24th May, 2002 03:37 PM

The globalwin TAK68 is also a very quiet HSF thats able to cool high performance CPUs :)

K6-III 25th May, 2002 04:25 AM

The Radeon7500 should be no prob, as at .15micon it doesn't even need active cooling....

dimmreaper 25th May, 2002 08:04 AM

You can get away with less air-flow through the case(less fans and less noise) if you use ducts to direct cool air to were it is needed most. The CPU, and GPU need the cool air, the rest of the system does not need to have air ducted to it. The exception to that is if your graphics card or system memory are overclocked, in which case they need some cool air to be ducted to them too . . .

loop 25th May, 2002 09:54 AM

A thought just occured to me!

If you lower the voltag on your processor and underclock it then that will wont churn out so much heat and same with your GFX card. Not sure how you lower the voltage on a GFX card though.

The Spyder 25th May, 2002 06:01 PM

I dont think you can lower the voltage on a GF card..... i have put together a system w/ a zalman flower- keeps it quiet and 40-50c load and folding- so about 35-45 normail- XP 1800----
Spyder

SteveI 25th May, 2002 07:45 PM

With a K7S5A, undervolting is not an option... unless you want to cut some bridges on the CPU. The mobo runs relatively cool. Your best bet is to replace the HSF (usually most of the noise) with a large HSF that accomodates a 8cm fan. These fans blow more and are quieter than the 6cm versions. Usually they are a bit pricey. Also, the case you are using will be a big part of the noise, through insulation. On any Athlon, you need a decent amount of airflow, so make sure you use quiet 8cm fans there too. The air should have little restriction. If it is too restrictive, you end up with noise from turbulence, and poor air flow, to boot.

What case are you using?

EDIT: seems as though you don't have any case fans... This is definitely a bad idea if you are considering a low noise solution for HSF... Quiet case fans will keep your case temp from going too high. Otherwise, even with a good HSF youre CPU may overheat. Noise is subjective.. However, 2 or 3 quiet fans is usually a lot better than 1 loud one, and can be equally effective if well planned out.

BongWater 27th May, 2002 07:22 AM

I'd agree with Random Nonsense...an AX-7 with a nice quiet fan (Panaflo or other), and nice quiet 120mm fans in and out shud always be sufficient IMHO.

BongWater

superally 28th May, 2002 04:55 PM

Guys

First of all, thanks for the input so far - very useful since I'm new to this stuff. One more question tho' - if I'm going to put a couple of quiet case fans on (which seems to be the consensus), assuming one needs to be "in" and one "out", where on the case should they go?

The case is a standard ATX tower - PSU at the top, m/board on the right hand wall looking from the front, a couple of inches to spare top and bottom.

Cheers

Ally

JayJay 28th May, 2002 05:02 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by superally
Guys

First of all, thanks for the input so far - very useful since I'm new to this stuff. One more question tho' - if I'm going to put a couple of quiet case fans on (which seems to be the consensus), assuming one needs to be "in" and one "out", where on the case should they go?


Assuming you want to place 2 case fans, I suggest one EXHAUST at the center top of the case and one INTAKE at the side panel :)

You gotta mod the case tho.........

As of now does your case have any fans at all?? Amd spec recommend, assuming there are ZERO fans in your case, one INTAKE at the front and one EXHAUST at the back.

JayJay 28th May, 2002 05:04 PM

So if you really want good airflow, INTAKEs at the front and side of the case and EXHAUSTs at the top and back of the case. A total of 4 fans. ;)

superally 28th May, 2002 05:14 PM

no case fans at all at the moment (the pc started life as a packard bell 450 pIII and the case is the only bit left from the original). Presumably just a matter of getting the dremel out and cutting a hole in the appropriate places then connecting the fans up to spare PSU connections?

Exhausting to the top would make sense, the one thing I'm curious about is where to put the intake - the left hand side of the case is exposed (pc sits in a RH corner) and the motherboard sits on rh side so lhs would seem like the obvious choice but do I put it towards the base to get some flow up through the whole case or is it better halfway up helping out the cpu fan?

btw, on the passive heatsink for the radeon question, i checked zalman's korean homepage and they don't recommend it without an extra fan on a bracket in close proximity for faster cards like Radeons and GeForce - which sort of defeats my purpose I think.

Case fans (as an ex-engineer) just "feel" like the right idea here anyway, particularly as I am going to go with the sound-deadening on some of the internal case walls.

Thanks for all your help on this stuff so far guys.

Cheers

Ally

JayJay 28th May, 2002 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by superally
no case fans at all at the moment (the pc started life as a packard bell 450 pIII and the case is the only bit left from the original). Presumably just a matter of getting the dremel out and cutting a hole in the appropriate places then connecting the fans up to spare PSU connections?

Exhausting to the top would make sense, the one thing I'm curious about is where to put the intake - the left hand side of the case is exposed (pc sits in a RH corner) and the motherboard sits on rh side so lhs would seem like the obvious choice but do I put it towards the base to get some flow up through the whole case or is it better halfway up helping out the cpu fan?

btw, on the passive heatsink for the radeon question, i checked zalman's korean homepage and they don't recommend it without an extra fan on a bracket in close proximity for faster cards like Radeons and GeForce - which sort of defeats my purpose I think.

Case fans (as an ex-engineer) just "feel" like the right idea here anyway, particularly as I am going to go with the sound-deadening on some of the internal case walls.

Thanks for all your help on this stuff so far guys.

Cheers

Ally

Yep, its that easy!!! just connect the fans to the spare connectors :) Ive done a few Dremel projects, not too hard either.

Placing it at the side, as close as possible to the CPU heatsink fan, in my opinion, is the best :) You'll definitely get much lower CPU temps. Having it help out the CPU fan will ensure that the heatsink will always get FRESH COOL AIR which is essential for cooling todays high performance CPUs. :)

cloasters 28th May, 2002 07:24 PM

Some folks cut holes to mount 120mm fans in "impossible" places. Such as the front panel, the steel part, not the plastic part--this makes cutting a huge hole in the front plastic bezel mandatory, because the new fan must be "fed" correctly.

I've seen this done with an Enlight 7237 and gave it some thought. Too much of the structural strength of the front panel was thrown out the window by cutting this gaping maw, IMHO.

It's best to cut cases before they have any components in them. Removing the steel bits that land in the case is an obvious task. But the steel powder is what will murder a machine. Cutting into left hand panels, and top covers that are removable avoids unpleasant arcin' and sparkin,' as long as you clean away steel detritus after cutting and filing.

Covers are easier to cut than integral parts of the case. The tricky part is finding the spot/s where fan/s will not interfere with the innards of the case. Careful study is best, 'cause the fan will bump into IDE/AGP cards in the rear of the case as well as the HDD's, Floppy and CD-ROM drives in the front of the case. Slapping yourself with a "Doh!" for good measure is very embarrassing after spending a goodly amount of time learning that sheet metal is easily dimpled and distorted, yet hard to cut.

And once the steel is gone, it won't grow back. Or, you can mount them as you please within reason, if you leave the fan on the outside of the case cover. As long as you use a filter on them, the only problem may be condescending sniffs from guests. And that's only an opinion, anway!

If you are not prepared to figure out puzzackly where ducts should go, I recommend 120mm fans. Sure they're big, but smaller fans can't move as much air, unless they spin at very high speeds, which means noise.

The Spyder 29th May, 2002 12:24 AM

I installed a 120mm nidec 60cfm fan in the front of my antec 1035 case- no front plastic mods- just cutting a whole in the front of the metal w/ a 120mm hole saw- works great and with everything running its quite-
SPyder

flack 30th May, 2002 11:49 PM

Hey Guys
 
I have a server case with four fans on it two 70 mm pulling air out the back and two 120 mm fans..... one at the front bottom of the case...... and one at the top above the power supply pulling out. ....these are all controlled by little units I made for a few pounds..... these units control the fans by allowing me to set the temp at which the fans operate.... and I have them setup so that they only come on when I really load the system......... my temps are case 26c ....cpu idle 55 ............ cpu loaded 57c and the case 28c..........

I can ajust these temps very accurately with these sensors...... This makes the whole system very quiet because the 90% of the time the fans are not running..... and when they do its only at a slow speed so they do not create any niose.

It takes about an hour to make one and costs very little... and to setup is very easy..........

I have been messing to get the best cooling for my system for ages and this is the best I have done so far...


CPU 2 gig
Asus A7V333


Flack...

BongWater 30th May, 2002 11:58 PM

How about you post some pics of that system!


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