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-   -   Need help with BIOS Supervisor Password problem (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/crashed/24250-need-help-bios-supervisor-password-problem.html)

danrok 10th May, 2004 02:29 PM

The post numbers are next to the exclamation mark, top right corner.

JayC 10th May, 2004 02:38 PM

Oh I get it! Duuuuhh !!

Like this one is post #21

Okay then.

danrok 10th May, 2004 02:38 PM

I was asking about the CPU settings, just to verify that it is set to it's stock speed. Which should be 9 x 133mhz = 1.2Ghz.

Change these as follows:
First Boot Device Floppy
Second Boot Device CDROM
Third Boot Device HDD-0
Boot Other Device Disabled

Boot up Floppy Seek Enabled

Once your machine is up and running it would be a good idea to enable these:

System BIOS Cacheable
Video RAM Cacheable

Leave them disabled for now. Once the OS is installed enable them and if there are no problems leave them enabled for best performance.

How many hard disks do you have and what models are they?

JayC 10th May, 2004 02:43 PM

Danrock,

I don't know what make or model they are.
(If it's any excuse) I bought my computer ready made.

I can tell that the HDDs are 20GB UMDA hard drives (just two of them.)
Is there some way that I can find out what they are, from where I sit now in front of my spare computer (Toshiba 3000 Satellite laptop.)?

JayC 10th May, 2004 02:49 PM

Oh, about the boot device sequence: you've got to know this -- I've been recommended to set my first boot device to the CD drive.

So that I can boot my crashed computer from the Win 2000 Pro CD which has a Win Setup program on it which (apparently) does a whole load of diagnosing and what-have-you as it tries or succeeds to REPAIR my Win2000 Pro installation. I certainly don't want to have to re-install over my not-backed-up paid for other software !! Not to mention my own work that's on my RAID 0 array.

Do I sound a somewhat upset? ....

danrok 10th May, 2004 03:04 PM

Ok, leave CDROM first. Should the OS crash you would still be able to get into the BIOS to change the boot order as need be.

Windows won't be able to 'see' your RAID array because the relevant driver is not on the install CD.

I think Win2000 install is similar to WinXP in that you must have the RAID controller driver on a separate floppy disk. During the very first stage of the install you should see a message on the screen which will read something like "Press [F6] now to install a third party SCSI or RAID driver.". So press the F6 key at this point. It may not ask you for the floppy immediately, but a little later on.

If you don't have the original RAID drivers on floppy you will have to find, download and put them on a blank floppy.

danrok 10th May, 2004 03:11 PM

Also, you should be able to install windows without wiping out your own existing data.

To do this, you must not delete any partitions or format any partitions. Simply install to the existing windows folder. The previous windows system files will be overwritten, but any non-windows files will remain on the disk. You would lose some things such as all registry information, outlook passwords, etc.

danrok 10th May, 2004 03:21 PM

The root of your strife is that RAID was never originally designed for use on home computers by non-techies. It is designed for server use. I have seen system administrators struggle with RAID arrays. I have watched IBMs own guys spend a week getting RAIDed servers up and running correctly. RAID 0 is far from reliable, I would never use it myself.

danrok 10th May, 2004 03:26 PM

Whilst the machine boots does it offer you the opportunity to enter the RAID BIOS set-up utility?

JayC 10th May, 2004 03:28 PM

Phew !!

You are the first person who's told me that it is possible to re-install Windows 2000 without loss of (my) data and software. That is a big, big, big relief.

And the registry settings ... would the loss of these mean that a re-install of the various software which I have which is not Windows, would it mean that these have to be re-installed, or what?

Finally: Window 2000 Pro Setup is having some difficult detecting my hard drives.
I've been made to understand that this problem can be put right by adjusting some BIOS feature which will tell Windows Setup that there are hard drives.

Can you confirm this? And do you (or anyone else) know which BIOS feature I should tweak so that it tells Windows about the existence of my hard disks?

Thanks again.

JayC 10th May, 2004 03:31 PM

About the boot ...

Yes the boot sequence is offering <CTRL> <H>
to access the RAID BIOS Utility.

Which is for setting up RAID configurations, and related matters -- I think.

JayC 10th May, 2004 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by danrok
The root of your strife is that RAID was never originally designed for use on home computers by non-techies. It is designed for server use. I have seen system administrators struggle with RAID arrays. I have watched IBMs own guys spend a week getting RAIDed servers up and running correctly. RAID 0 is far from reliable, I would never use it myself.

Okay.

Just as an aside: how do-able is it these days (2004) to get a disk set up other than RAID which provides both impressive speed and possibly, the ability to mirror a disk?
Just as an aside -- 'cos I fully intend to get my RAID array up and running again.

danrok 10th May, 2004 04:08 PM

Do the <Ctrl><H> thing. The answer may well lie there. Unfortunately I am not familiar with that screen on your board. But, the RAID BIOS has far fewer options than the system BIOS. Do you have the manual for it? If not download it.

If you do an 'over the top' install of windows the applications will still be on disk, but may or may not work due to the registry being wiped out. You would either have to install the programs again or attempt to enter the correct keys and values in the registry by hand. The latter is best avoided unless it is essential.

To be honest. I would say that you are best off forgetting about RAID. Hopefully you will be able to get this array back up and your work off it.

You might consider SATA and a Western Digital Raptor drive which is the fastest type of drive. I would reccommend two drives of the same capacity. If you really feel you want mirroring then go ahead. Mirroring only offers protection against a disk physicially failing, any logical data corruptions will be written to both drives. If you do get mirroring be sure that you know how to recover a mirrored disk in the event of a failure. I mean fully understand what it's all about before using it.

You could simply have two drives, say C: and D:. Actual drives that is. Then backup your work from one drive to the other on say a daily basis using drag and drop file copy. Perhaps, once a week you could make an offline backup to CD or tape. This method is nigh on 100% safe provided that you check that the backup is really working and that you are copying all required files.


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