AOA Forums

AOA Forums (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/)
-   General Hardware Discussion (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/7-general-hardware-discussion/)
-   -   Toshiba announce DDR memory for SSDs (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/general-hardware-discussion/49225-toshiba-announce-ddr-memory-for-ssds.html)

danrok 12th August, 2010 07:50 PM

Toshiba announce DDR memory for SSDs
 
More speed, less power consumption.

See front page:
Toshiba announce DDR memory for SSDs

Comments?

booman 15th August, 2010 03:37 PM

I'm confused, they are using DDR for the actual SSD hard drive, or its onboard memory cache?
Just asking because SSD drives are already made of flash memory and DDR is temporary memory...

danrok 15th August, 2010 05:29 PM

That's the point, this is DDR flash memory.

cloasters 15th August, 2010 08:39 PM

Cool, faster SSD's are on the way. Here's hoping that their price will drop considerably. Thanks for the link, danrok!

booman 16th August, 2010 02:03 PM

how the heck are they making DDR permanently store data?

Gizmo 16th August, 2010 04:08 PM

DDR simply specifies the interface speed and type, not the memory type. The fact that up to this point DDR has been used in conjunction with SDRAM is just a historical coincidence (and matter of convenience). Technically, I could interface a hard drive to the system using the DDR signalling scheme if I really wanted to.

Up to this point (AFAIK), flash memory has used a parallel bus signaling scheme (set an address on the address pins, read the data out 8 bits or 16 bits at a time on the data pins). This scheme is the way pretty much all memory operated 30 years ago. Modern hardware uses some type of serial signaling scheme (SPI, DDR) because it can be driven faster and is easier to route signals for.

booman 16th August, 2010 04:20 PM

Its pretty cool. So are they projecting DDR will read/write faster and have a longer life span?

Gizmo 16th August, 2010 07:31 PM

No, all DDR will do is allow them to get the data to/from the chip faster. Being able to read/write the chip faster or have a longer life span really has nothing to do with the signaling scheme.

It's worth noting, though, that up to this point, the read/write speeds on flash have been such that there really wasn't any POINT in using a different signalling scheme.

cloasters 16th August, 2010 08:49 PM

Those Toshibans, what'll they do next?

eissa4444 29th August, 2010 07:21 PM

thaaaaaaaaanxxxxxxxxxx


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:12 AM.


Copyright ©2001 - 2010, AOA Forums


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0