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Intel Motherboards & CPUs Questions or comments on INTEL products?


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Old 1st April, 2002, 06:42 PM
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How to Overclock Memory

I have ASUS CUV4X Motherboard with 256M NOVA 133 Mhz Ram.

I see some guys overclock their Memory to gain speed.

I saw in my Bios I can set the System/SDRAM Frequency Ratio.
Auto 1/1 or 4/3 (synchronous or asynchronous mode)
What is the function for?
Then futher on SDRAM Configuration Options are
[User Define] [7 ns (143MHz)] [8ns (125 MHz)] [By SPD]

What can I do and what precautions should I take not to fry my Memory?

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Old 2nd April, 2002, 04:02 AM
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Setting the memory ratio to 1/1 runs the memory at the same speed as the FSB(system clock).

Setting the memory ratio to 4/3 runs the memory at 75% of the FSB, or 100MHz when the FSB is 133MHz.

Since the only way to overclock the multiplier locked Pentium 3 is to increase the FSB, which you are already doing, as long as your BIOS is set to 1/1 then you ARE overclocking your memory.

If you decide to push your FSB beyond 150MHz, you may find that you need to set the memory ratio to 4/3 because the memory won't overclock well enough. However, if you do push the FSB beyond 150MHz be sure to make a back-up copy of your harddrive with a program like Norton Ghost.

You can't fry parts with operating frequency, only heat and excesive voltage kill parts. Don't worry about your memory getting hurt.
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Old 2nd April, 2002, 07:28 PM
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Hi Dimm
If I understand you correctly you say if I change the System/SDRAM Frequency Ratio to 150 MHz it will change my Memory speed only and not the whole systems FSB speed??
Do you really get so mush more speed out of your machine when you overclock your memory?
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Old 3rd April, 2002, 12:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pappajoe
If I understand you correctly you say if I change the System/SDRAM Frequency Ratio to 150 MHz it will change my Memory speed only and not the whole systems FSB speed??
If you set the FSB to 150MHz and set the memory ratio to 1/1, the memory and FSB are both running at 150MHZ. If you set the FSB to 150 and the memory ratio to 4/3, the FSB will run at 150MHz and the memory will run at 112.5MHz. The FSB is how fast the CPU "talks to" the chipset, the memory speed is how fast the memory "talks to" the chipset.
Quote:
Originally posted by Pappajoe
Do you really get so mush more speed out of your machine when you overclock your memory?
50% of the instructions that make up the typical X86 multimedia application are of the load/store variety. So yes, you will see a nice little boost in performance. However a 10% increase in memory speed does not give a 10% increase in memory bandwidth, more like 2-3% it seems.
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Old 7th April, 2002, 01:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by dimmreaper
If you set the FSB to 150MHz and set the memory ratio to 1/1, the memory and FSB are both running at 150MHZ. If you set the FSB to 150 and the memory ratio to 4/3, the FSB will run at 150MHz and the memory will run at 112.5MHz. The FSB is how fast the CPU "talks to" the chipset, the memory speed is how fast the memory "talks to" the chipset.
50% of the instructions that make up the typical X86 multimedia application are of the load/store variety. So yes, you will see a nice little boost in performance. However a 10% increase in memory speed does not give a 10% increase in memory bandwidth, more like 2-3% it seems.
maybe a tad more.
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