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-   -   Cant get much older than this! (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/intel-motherboards-and-cpus/29942-cant-get-much-older-than-this.html)

Rondog 12th March, 2005 12:07 PM

Cant get much older than this!
 
Socket 7 Pentium 1, 100mhz(ish), SD-RAM slot, and a different kind, I think its ED-RAM. Not sure. Being basically used as a Linux system. Fiddled with BIOS. Now the hard-drive doesnt work. Disk I/O error. Reformatted it with my main rig, and put system files on it. Still nothing. Any thoughts?

Its not really important, its just sentimental, was given to me by a dear friend, when he got a new one. He has since passed away, so I would like to get it up and running.

dolanenwindrift 12th March, 2005 03:28 PM

You may have to go into the BIOS and manually set the HDD parameters - you know, cylinders, heads and sectors. The info should be printed somewhere on the drive or you can go to the manufacturer's web site and locate the info there. It is also possible that you simply need to re-run the IDE detect procedure... in some BIOS there is an option to 'Detect IDE Devices' or something similar, and if your motherboard is set up this way click the option and let it run through all 4 channels (Master and Slave on Primary and Secondary). Give it a try and good luck.

Rondog 13th March, 2005 12:48 AM

Done all of that. It finds nothing. I'll try a new cable later, and see where I end up. If its just a faulty cable i'll be pretty iritated.

alexkerhead 13th March, 2005 02:19 PM

some pentium 1 systems dont support drives bigger than 8GB, and 99% of them will not support over 32GB.
So options are limited.
try setting the jumper on the drive to 32GB compat mode (IF it has one and is over 32gb)

Rondog 14th March, 2005 12:25 PM

LoL. Its a 1.8gig, I dont think thats the problem. :)

dolanenwindrift 14th March, 2005 04:42 PM

well it really would seem to either be a bad HDD - and at that age it certainly could be - or a bad IDE controller or cable. Try swapping the drive over to the secondary channel if the new cable doesn't work.

Rondog 15th March, 2005 08:12 AM

Will a hard drive boot a the secondary IDE port?

Aedan 15th March, 2005 10:46 AM

Probably not on a system that age. There's some odd things with LBA vs CHS vs Large types of arranging data on the hard disk. If you use the wrong setting, then the BIOS will misintepret the data that's already on the disk, which can be a problem if you've moved files across from another machine.

Another possibility is that the disk really has died.

Rondog 15th March, 2005 10:50 AM

The disk hasnt died, because my good rig (Athlon) picks it up, and picks up the files on it. It isnt the file system, because its a FAT16. Its not the BIOS settings, because I emailed the manufacturer for the correct ones. Its either the cable or connection. I hope its the cable.

Aedan 15th March, 2005 10:53 AM

The comment about the LBA/CHS/Large disk setting is for the BIOS (check under the drive types) - it changes how the BIOS sees the drive. I know from past experience that if you get it wrong, then the machine will have problems getting the right data off the disk, whatever the file system is.

Rondog 15th March, 2005 10:59 AM

No, I mean, I got the correct settings for BIOS, heads, sectors and the rest of it.

keithwalton 15th March, 2005 02:56 PM

Just a random idea are you using an old type 40wire ide cable with it or the newer 80cable type, the latter may cause some issues. It should be an LBA drive i think that comes in effect from drives greater than 500 or so megs

Rondog 16th March, 2005 07:02 AM

What do you mean by 40wire and 80wire cable? Only one sort will fit it.

Rondog 18th March, 2005 02:02 PM

S-U-C-C-E-S-S! Thats the way you spell success. I was fiddling with the hard-drive and it took my forgetfulness to get it working...BIOS wouldnt pick it up as a master, but it picks it up as a slave and boots. Odd isnt it?

Next problem: Whats a good linux for a beginner? RedHat, Debain?

Rondog 19th March, 2005 10:11 AM

OK: Perhaps not. The system boots, but it tells me something about its set as an LBA drive and it isnt, and stuff.

The system boots without a CD-ROM drive connected but when I connect it, i get REPLACE SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE. Any thoughts?

hoinar 19th March, 2005 11:38 AM

See that your hdd and cd-rom are set one as master and one as slave if they're on the same IDE cable.
And check in the Bios that the hdd is the one your machine boots from(put the cd-rom in the boot list after hdd). :) gl

dsio 19th March, 2005 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rondog
S-U-C-C-E-S-S! Thats the way you spell success. I was fiddling with the hard-drive and it took my forgetfulness to get it working...BIOS wouldnt pick it up as a master, but it picks it up as a slave and boots. Odd isnt it?

Next problem: Whats a good linux for a beginner? RedHat, Debain?

mandrake is the best beginner linux distro, though there are many others that are windows friendly, they pretend to be windows to the point where you arnt learning about linux. the only downside is mandrake is very dependent on X and if you run it from bash, there is on difference between mandrake and any other distro.

You will need something very very cutdown or old to run even bash on that machine. if you have 64MB ram or more i would recommend slackware or Gentoo. Gentoo might work a lot better as its a very efficient OS, however slackware is efficient out of the box. slack is a brilliant server distro too. if you have less than 64MB, you will need something very very old. NetBSD is worth a look. If it can run off an iPod or a tungsten T (though even a T's TI Omap chip is more powerful than that pentium) so it will run on that old machine no worries.

Rondog 19th March, 2005 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dsio
mandrake is the best beginner linux distro, though there are many others that are windows friendly, they pretend to be windows to the point where you arnt learning about linux. the only downside is mandrake is very dependent on X and if you run it from bash, there is on difference between mandrake and any other distro.

You will need something very very cutdown or old to run even bash on that machine. if you have 64MB ram or more i would recommend slackware or Gentoo. Gentoo might work a lot better as its a very efficient OS, however slackware is efficient out of the box. slack is a brilliant server distro too. if you have less than 64MB, you will need something very very old. NetBSD is worth a look. If it can run off an iPod or a tungsten T (though even a T's TI Omap chip is more powerful than that pentium) so it will run on that old machine no worries.

Will Mandrake run on a Pentium 1 133mhz, 32mb RAM,?

honiar: I put them on separate IDE cables and it works now. So thanks anyway.

dsio 19th March, 2005 01:02 PM

I really really dont think so, and even if it did, you would wish it didnt. The RAM is far too low really to do much. if you had another 32MB you could do something, but as it is there isnt much hope.

NetBSD is worth a look for it, and possibly Gentoo.

Else get a very very old distro, like redhat 5.2

Rondog 19th March, 2005 01:23 PM

Is NETBSD linux-y or id it linux for lazy people who dont wanna learn true linux? no offence


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