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Old 6th April, 2003, 07:46 AM
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NIC Cards

i need some advice off someone please...

im connected to broadband cable(Blueyonder / Telewest), when i had it fitted they install a NIC card for me, but now ive got a new mobo with onboard LAN...

now here's the big Question

Whats best for my PC performance wise. PCI-NIC card or onboard NIC

the PCI NIC = netgear FA311
the onboard = Nvidia Nforce2


Here's my spec....
AMD 2.1Ghz XP+
Leadtek GF4 Ti4200
512 DDR2700
onboard Nvidia Nforce2
2 x 40gb WD harddrives

Nothing is OC'd its all running as standard
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Idle temp = sys 27, CPU 37'ish
Load temp = sys 30, CPU 42'ish

Last edited by PC PLOD; 6th April, 2003 at 07:50 AM.
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Old 6th April, 2003, 08:00 AM
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I'd go ahead and stick with the on-board lan. No need in having ANOTHER card in your system if it's not really needed.
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Old 6th April, 2003, 08:17 PM
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Re: NIC Cards

Quote:
Originally posted by PC PLOD
the PCI NIC = netgear FA311
the onboard = Nvidia Nforce2
Ask yourself - which is faster, the network card or the broadband connection?

Even if you were on the trial of the 2Meg broadband connection, your network card would still be over 50times faster than your broadband connection! You're not likely to notice the difference.

However! Telewest tend to use the "MAC" (or hardware) address of the network card in order to "authenticate" you to the network. You'd need to inform them of the new MAC address before you could use the connection. Their website has further details - it's a change you can do online.

Áedán
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Old 6th April, 2003, 08:35 PM
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i got my other MAC addy register'd and its all running great but what i wanna know is does the onboard use a % of the CPU ??
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Old 6th April, 2003, 11:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by PC PLOD
i got my other MAC addy register'd and its all running great but what i wanna know is does the onboard use a % of the CPU ??
All network cards use a small percentage of the CPU, as they're devices that need servicing.

If you mean "is the onboard network card like a softmodem?", then the answer is no. The onboard network card is a fully hardware based solution, and doesn't require the CPU to attend to each and every byte sent/received.

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Old 7th April, 2003, 03:55 AM
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The onboard nVidia NIC built into the MCP2 is supposedly one of the best ethernet solutions out there. Very low CPU utilization with high throughput. The only thing missing is some of the diagnostic stuff available with 3COM stuff.
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Old 7th April, 2003, 06:38 AM
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thanks guys + gals for your time......
i think i'll stick with onbord NIC
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Old 7th April, 2003, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by mookydooky
The only thing missing is some of the diagnostic stuff available with 3COM stuff.
I've never used it to be honest. 3Com are not my favourite network card manufacturer.

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Old 7th April, 2003, 06:36 PM
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Re: Re: NIC Cards

Quote:
Originally posted by Áedán


"MAC" (or hardware) address of the network card in order to "authenticate" you to the network. You'd need to inform them of the new MAC address before you could use the connection. Their website has further details - it's a change you can do online.

Áedán
umm wouldnt they use a login|password to authenticate you?

i thought the mac adress is registered in the server's 'lookup' (?) table when it is assigned an ip adress. (Address Resolution Protocol?)
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Old 7th April, 2003, 06:58 PM
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Re: Re: Re: NIC Cards

Quote:
Originally posted by piccoLEW
umm wouldnt they use a login|password to authenticate you?

i thought the mac adress is registered in the server's 'lookup' (?) table when it is assigned an ip adress. (Address Resolution Protocol?)
With Telewest, if you have not registered the MAC address of your network card, you cannot even get an IP address. Hence, it's a first step of authentication.

Registered in this case means gone to their website and typed the number in, or rung them up and read the number out to them.

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Old 7th April, 2003, 07:01 PM
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Re: Re: Re: NIC Cards

Quote:
Originally posted by piccoLEW
i thought the mac adress is registered in the server's 'lookup' (?) table when it is assigned an ip adress. (Address Resolution Protocol?)
That's DHCP - where a client makes a broadcast using a specially created packet. A server might then answer the broadcast by directing a packet back to the client with various options in it. Some of these options could be the IP address etc.

ARP is used when you're on a LAN, and you need to know the MAC address of another machine. However, you only have the IP address. A machine will then do an ARP broadcast (Who has IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx?), to which the machine with the IP address will respond (I have IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx).

Down at the network card addressing level, IP addresses don't mean anything!

Áedán
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