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-   -   I need help installing Nvidia Drivers...oh the shame of it! (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=50766)

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 05:02 AM

I need help installing Nvidia Drivers...oh the shame of it!
 
My Mint installer isn't ready to release my new cards drivers...so I'm showing a bit of initiative by asking that some one guide me through this.

I have the drivers downloaded and the basic command to install them, but I'm UN-easy about shutting down the X-server and attendant situations that might arise in terminal once I get started....

So if your able, please say when would be a good time for us to meet in the forums, I can rise early or stay up late...":O|

Here are the "Basic instructions:


Installation instructions: Once you have downloaded the driver, change to the directory containing the driver package and install the driver by running, as root, sh ./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-304.43.run

One of the last installation steps will offer to update your X configuration file. Either accept that offer, edit your X configuration file manually so that the NVIDIA X driver will be used, or run nvidia-xconfig

Note that the list of supported GPU products is provided to indicate which GPUs are supported by a particular driver version. Some designs incorporating supported GPUs may not be compatible with the NVIDIA Linux driver: in particular, notebook and all-in-one desktop designs with switchable (hybrid) or Optimus graphics will not work if means to disable the integrated graphics in hardware are not available. Hardware designs will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, so please consult with a system's manufacturer to determine whether that particular system is compatible.

More complete instructions are found here:

Aedan 21st September, 2012 12:22 PM

Glad you found a use for the instructions I posted in this thread. :)

Some caveats here (from bitter experience!) . If you want to switch to the nVidia provided driver, I'd recommend you have DKMS installed. The reason for this is that if you don't, you'll have to re-install the driver each time a kernel update happens if you want your graphical environment to keep working. If you don't install DKMS, then you have to manually re-install the driver each time there's a kernel update.

I'd also recommend uninstalling the distro provided nVidia driver, as I've encountered issues in the past where bits of the old driver prevent the new driver from working (Sound familiar to you?). If you don't, you may be at risk of losing your graphical environment.

You'll also need at least the kernel headers installed for the current kernel you're running, and you'll need a working version of a compiler. I don't know if Mint ships with a suitable build environment, Ubuntu doesn't.

Aedan 21st September, 2012 12:29 PM

That said, it looks like xorg-edgers have a ppa for it. You can try the following:
Code:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings

If you have to do things by hand, then they can get a lot more complex very quickly, so I'd like to try to avoid getting you to do things by hand if I can.

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 519570)
Glad you found a use for the instructions I posted in this thread. :)

Some caveats here (from bitter experience!) . If you want to switch to the nVidia provided driver, I'd recommend you have DKMS installed. The reason for this is that if you don't, you'll have to re-install the driver each time a kernel update happens if you want your graphical environment to keep working. If you don't install DKMS, then you have to manually re-install the driver each time there's a kernel update.

I'd also recommend uninstalling the distro provided nVidia driver, as I've encountered issues in the past where bits of the old driver prevent the new driver from working (Sound familiar to you?). If you don't, you may be at risk of losing your graphical environment.

You'll also need at least the kernel headers installed for the current kernel you're running, and you'll need a working version of a compiler. I don't know if Mint ships with a suitable build environment, Ubuntu doesn't.

The first thing I tried was removing the current drivers, thinking it would re-access my card and go get new drivers. How some ever...It didn't seem to revert to Linux video drivers, instead it took out everything on my desktop. No icons in the tool bar. no Menu, nothining! I had a restore on hand! ":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 519571)
That said, it looks like xorg-edgers have a ppa for it. You can try the following:
Code:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings
nvidia-settings

If you have to do things by hand, then they can get a lot more complex very quickly, so I'd like to try to avoid getting you to do things by hand if I can.

I tried Bodhi's script, It seems to have worked. I was late and I couldn't find System information and Bodhi doesn't install the Nvidia app, just the drivers.

I'll give this a go!

If it get to be a hand job, I think I'll wait for a Mint update...":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 07:09 PM

6 Attachment(s)
Here how it went, after posting this I'll reboot. Sorry about the skips and redundancies, I tried to get as much of it as I could...":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 07:12 PM

1 Attachment(s)
But here's the part you want to see! Thank you very much Aedan! This will let me continue to progress with one less thing to doubt in the mix!":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 08:55 PM

After all of that... Now Nvidia X-server won't open. It the must has lost touch with the app. The Icon is still there, just fails to open. Tried a re-boot, no joy.

booman 21st September, 2012 09:09 PM

man, this is a difficult one because its easier to troubleshoot if I was there.
I've explained the steps elsewhere for Fedora Nvidia drivers.
Downloading headers, kernels, stopping X Server
running the .sh
rebooting and whalla its ready to go.... but if something goes wrong, you've got to start over and try it again.

This is definitely the frustration of Linux

I'm not totally sure how to remove the old drivers... I'll have to look it up

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 10:07 PM

The drivers installed. But The Nvidia X server app went south...It was there(See picture show the 3.0 drivers after my re-boot. Did some stuff with POL and went back to look and it would not open. So I tried a " Sudo apt-get Nvidia Xserver "

Couldn't find it. So I tried the same but with "Upgrade" Boy did it! but I may have made a mistake when it asked if I wanted the maintainers version or my Mint version, I went with the maintainer.

I've tried to get it to give me another shot, but it just says I'm Current.

I have a back up from last night, I may just start over...":O}

booman 21st September, 2012 11:06 PM

That sucks
In some ways using a backup might make it harder to start over.
I usually start over 'from scratch' with a brand new install of Mint 13.
Takes more time, but at least any changes that conflicts are gone.

Sometimes the changes in your backup are conflicting with the new changes... I have no idea how to undo those

ThunderRd 22nd September, 2012 06:45 AM

I don't know what you mean by the app Nvidia-Xserver. Are you referring rather to the Nvidia settings manager?

My Debian lingo has gone a little bit by the wayside, but IIRC the settings manager is called simply 'nvidia-settings'. Try 'sudo apt-get nvidia-settings' and see if it re-installs. FWIW though, it's not an essential package for the driver to work. The graphics system should work just fine without it until you work out the glitch.

Also, Aedan is right about using the distro's version of the driver. This is the 'package manager-aware method', and for you is the safest. I have been there, too, with the .sh/.run files straight from the Nvidia site, and I eventually worked out a system to update in a fairly painless fashion, but DKMS and the distro version driver is much, much easier. Remember that anything you install outside of the package manager isn't 'registered' with the PM, so you have to update it manually. That means, 'by hand', as you have found out. Also, with DKMS, you shouldn't get a broken graphics system when you update the kernel. After you reboot into a new kernel version, DKMS will take over and automatically install the river for the new kernel. It works well. I can't remember ever having problems with it, and my kernel in aptosid gets updated on a monthly basis.

Even in Gentoo, where we do lots of things manually, I use the package manager for the Nvidia driver. It only requires that the /usr/src/linux symlink is pointing to the kernel in use. After configuring and building a new kernel version, I update the kernel/blob with a small utility that rebuilds the kernel modules. And that's it.

Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh(or .run) files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

booman 22nd September, 2012 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519613)
Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

Thats funny because I always got them to work better in Linux. Specially Fedora.
I'm using Mint 13 too and have not tried a manual installation.



You should be able to install Nvidia drivers with these steps:

Step 1 ? download drivers:
Download the R302.11 drivers from nvidia
NVIDIA-Linux-x86-304.43.run
(I rename it to something easy like nvidia.run)

Step 2 ? Stopping the display manager / X-server:
Open a shell with [Ctrl+Alt+F1].
Under Mint 13, the display manager is called mdm (Mint Display Manager).
Here is a radical way to stop it:
Code:

sudo killall mdm
Step 3 ? Installation of the drivers:
navigate to where you downloaded the driver
Code:

cd /home/username/Downloads
then make nvidia.run executable
Code:

sudo chmod +x nividia.run
execute it
Code:

sudo nvidia.run
Follow Nvidia prompts, agreeing to licenses... I said "OK" to all of them

Step 4 ? Reboot the system:
Code:

sudo reboot
Step 5 ? Check your drivers
Open a terminal and type:
Code:

nvidia-settings
______________________________________________
Remove Nvidia drivers:

Remove Nvidia drivers from the "Additional Drivers" interface.
or
Open a Terminal:
Code:

apt remove nvidia-current nvidia-settings
(If you installed a specific version this may be different but will still begin nvidia-)

ThunderRd 22nd September, 2012 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by booman (Post 519616)
Thats funny because I always got them to work better in Linux.

After I learned how, I had only an occasional problem as well. My advice here was for Daniel. With his special needs the process could be quite difficult to get right. I think the package manager route is best for him, although maybe not for you, if you want the cutting edge drivers.

Aedan 22nd September, 2012 06:20 PM

Iit sounds like you've got the drivers installed just fine, but the control panel app isn't quite so happy - that's good, but not great (given you can see the screen!). It may be possible to start it by starting a commandline and typing "nvidia-settings".

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 07:07 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519613)
I don't know what you mean by the app Nvidia-Xserver. Are you referring rather to the Nvidia settings manager?

My Debian lingo has gone a little bit by the wayside, but IIRC the settings manager is called simply 'nvidia-settings'. Try 'sudo apt-get nvidia-settings' and see if it re-installs. FWIW though, it's not an essential package for the driver to work. The graphics system should work just fine without it until you work out the glitch.

Also, Aedan is right about using the distro's version of the driver. This is the 'package manager-aware method', and for you is the safest. I have been there, too, with the .sh files straight from the Nvidia site, and I eventually worked out a system to update in a fairly painless fashion, but DKMS and the distro version driver is much, much easier. Remember that anything you install outside of the package manager isn't 'registered' with the PM, so you have to update it manually. That means, 'by hand', as you have found out. Also, with DKMS, you shouldn't get a broken graphics system when you update the kernel. After you reboot into a new kernel version, DKMS will take over and automatically install the river for the new kernel. It works well. I can't remember ever having problems with it, and my kernel in aptosid gets updated on a monthly basis.

Even in Gentoo, where we do lots of things manually, I use the package manager for the Nvidia driver. It only requires that the /usr/src/linux symlink is pointing to the kernel in use. After configuring and building a new kernel version, I update the kernel/blob with a small utility that rebuilds the kernel modules. And that's it.

Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh(or .run) files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

I did a restore and took the day off yesterday.

Here's the app in question back with the 295.49 driver,

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 07:26 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Hi Boo, TR, Aedan, You enrich me every day!

I can't tell how reassuring it is to have you guys show up with possible courses of action for me to take!

How some ever Aedan showed up first. As I realize that when I ask for help it creates an involvement and a stake in the solution, I try to stick with the one what brought me to the dance...At lest until the music stops.":O}

But please don't stop showing up on that account! LOL

Here we go again! ":O}

Repeating Aedan's instructions of yesterday, I will add the last "Nvidia settings"

Now, before re-boot and if that doesn't work, after I reboot.

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 07:40 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Once again we have success, drivers installed. And Nvidia Settings is still with us. (see pic). I'll keep an eye out during the day as see if we lose it again. If we do I'll apply Aidan's remedy and report back here. Many thanks! ":O}

What I really want from Nvidia settings are the adaptive settings...and just to know my systems "Right".

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 09:31 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Ok, how worried should I be? Take a look at the adaptive settings, It should top off at something like 1400, Chips vary. But 3500 seem out of the question for this card....Funny didn't do this yesterday did it? See First pic of Nvidia Settings)

Wonder what happened this time? At lest she idles nice and cool! Very quite as well,.... Suggestions?

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519613)
I don't know what you mean by the app Nvidia-Xserver. Are you referring rather to the Nvidia settings manager?

My Debian lingo has gone a little bit by the wayside, but IIRC the settings manager is called simply 'nvidia-settings'. Try 'sudo apt-get nvidia-settings' and see if it re-installs. FWIW though, it's not an essential package for the driver to work. The graphics system should work just fine without it until you work out the glitch.

Also, Aedan is right about using the distro's version of the driver. This is the 'package manager-aware method', and for you is the safest. I have been there, too, with the .sh files straight from the Nvidia site, and I eventually worked out a system to update in a fairly painless fashion, but DKMS and the distro version driver is much, much easier. Remember that anything you install outside of the package manager isn't 'registered' with the PM, so you have to update it manually. That means, 'by hand', as you have found out. Also, with DKMS, you shouldn't get a broken graphics system when you update the kernel. After you reboot into a new kernel version, DKMS will take over and automatically install the river for the new kernel. It works well. I can't remember ever having problems with it, and my kernel in aptosid gets updated on a monthly basis.

Even in Gentoo, where we do lots of things manually, I use the package manager for the Nvidia driver. It only requires that the /usr/src/linux symlink is pointing to the kernel in use. After configuring and building a new kernel version, I update the kernel/blob with a small utility that rebuilds the kernel modules. And that's it.

Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh(or .run) files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

Some great advice and I'm all ears! Other than using the "Additional drivers" app in Mint I can't imagine it being easier than 4 lines of code. Thank you for taking the time to elaborate my choices for me and I think your advocacy is correct, I'm an Easy kinda guy! ":O}

I've re-booted several times and Nvidia Settings is still with us...So I think Aedan's last line "nvidia-settings" Before I closed and rebooted did the trick.


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