AOA Forums

AOA Forums (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/index.php)
-   Linux (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=127)
-   -   I need help installing Nvidia Drivers...oh the shame of it! (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=50766)

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 05:02 AM

I need help installing Nvidia Drivers...oh the shame of it!
 
My Mint installer isn't ready to release my new cards drivers...so I'm showing a bit of initiative by asking that some one guide me through this.

I have the drivers downloaded and the basic command to install them, but I'm UN-easy about shutting down the X-server and attendant situations that might arise in terminal once I get started....

So if your able, please say when would be a good time for us to meet in the forums, I can rise early or stay up late...":O|

Here are the "Basic instructions:


Installation instructions: Once you have downloaded the driver, change to the directory containing the driver package and install the driver by running, as root, sh ./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-304.43.run

One of the last installation steps will offer to update your X configuration file. Either accept that offer, edit your X configuration file manually so that the NVIDIA X driver will be used, or run nvidia-xconfig

Note that the list of supported GPU products is provided to indicate which GPUs are supported by a particular driver version. Some designs incorporating supported GPUs may not be compatible with the NVIDIA Linux driver: in particular, notebook and all-in-one desktop designs with switchable (hybrid) or Optimus graphics will not work if means to disable the integrated graphics in hardware are not available. Hardware designs will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, so please consult with a system's manufacturer to determine whether that particular system is compatible.

More complete instructions are found here:

Aedan 21st September, 2012 12:22 PM

Glad you found a use for the instructions I posted in this thread. :)

Some caveats here (from bitter experience!) . If you want to switch to the nVidia provided driver, I'd recommend you have DKMS installed. The reason for this is that if you don't, you'll have to re-install the driver each time a kernel update happens if you want your graphical environment to keep working. If you don't install DKMS, then you have to manually re-install the driver each time there's a kernel update.

I'd also recommend uninstalling the distro provided nVidia driver, as I've encountered issues in the past where bits of the old driver prevent the new driver from working (Sound familiar to you?). If you don't, you may be at risk of losing your graphical environment.

You'll also need at least the kernel headers installed for the current kernel you're running, and you'll need a working version of a compiler. I don't know if Mint ships with a suitable build environment, Ubuntu doesn't.

Aedan 21st September, 2012 12:29 PM

That said, it looks like xorg-edgers have a ppa for it. You can try the following:
Code:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings

If you have to do things by hand, then they can get a lot more complex very quickly, so I'd like to try to avoid getting you to do things by hand if I can.

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 519570)
Glad you found a use for the instructions I posted in this thread. :)

Some caveats here (from bitter experience!) . If you want to switch to the nVidia provided driver, I'd recommend you have DKMS installed. The reason for this is that if you don't, you'll have to re-install the driver each time a kernel update happens if you want your graphical environment to keep working. If you don't install DKMS, then you have to manually re-install the driver each time there's a kernel update.

I'd also recommend uninstalling the distro provided nVidia driver, as I've encountered issues in the past where bits of the old driver prevent the new driver from working (Sound familiar to you?). If you don't, you may be at risk of losing your graphical environment.

You'll also need at least the kernel headers installed for the current kernel you're running, and you'll need a working version of a compiler. I don't know if Mint ships with a suitable build environment, Ubuntu doesn't.

The first thing I tried was removing the current drivers, thinking it would re-access my card and go get new drivers. How some ever...It didn't seem to revert to Linux video drivers, instead it took out everything on my desktop. No icons in the tool bar. no Menu, nothining! I had a restore on hand! ":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 519571)
That said, it looks like xorg-edgers have a ppa for it. You can try the following:
Code:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings
nvidia-settings

If you have to do things by hand, then they can get a lot more complex very quickly, so I'd like to try to avoid getting you to do things by hand if I can.

I tried Bodhi's script, It seems to have worked. I was late and I couldn't find System information and Bodhi doesn't install the Nvidia app, just the drivers.

I'll give this a go!

If it get to be a hand job, I think I'll wait for a Mint update...":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 07:09 PM

6 Attachment(s)
Here how it went, after posting this I'll reboot. Sorry about the skips and redundancies, I tried to get as much of it as I could...":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 07:12 PM

1 Attachment(s)
But here's the part you want to see! Thank you very much Aedan! This will let me continue to progress with one less thing to doubt in the mix!":O}

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 08:55 PM

After all of that... Now Nvidia X-server won't open. It the must has lost touch with the app. The Icon is still there, just fails to open. Tried a re-boot, no joy.

booman 21st September, 2012 09:09 PM

man, this is a difficult one because its easier to troubleshoot if I was there.
I've explained the steps elsewhere for Fedora Nvidia drivers.
Downloading headers, kernels, stopping X Server
running the .sh
rebooting and whalla its ready to go.... but if something goes wrong, you've got to start over and try it again.

This is definitely the frustration of Linux

I'm not totally sure how to remove the old drivers... I'll have to look it up

Daniel ~ 21st September, 2012 10:07 PM

The drivers installed. But The Nvidia X server app went south...It was there(See picture show the 3.0 drivers after my re-boot. Did some stuff with POL and went back to look and it would not open. So I tried a " Sudo apt-get Nvidia Xserver "

Couldn't find it. So I tried the same but with "Upgrade" Boy did it! but I may have made a mistake when it asked if I wanted the maintainers version or my Mint version, I went with the maintainer.

I've tried to get it to give me another shot, but it just says I'm Current.

I have a back up from last night, I may just start over...":O}

booman 21st September, 2012 11:06 PM

That sucks
In some ways using a backup might make it harder to start over.
I usually start over 'from scratch' with a brand new install of Mint 13.
Takes more time, but at least any changes that conflicts are gone.

Sometimes the changes in your backup are conflicting with the new changes... I have no idea how to undo those

ThunderRd 22nd September, 2012 06:45 AM

I don't know what you mean by the app Nvidia-Xserver. Are you referring rather to the Nvidia settings manager?

My Debian lingo has gone a little bit by the wayside, but IIRC the settings manager is called simply 'nvidia-settings'. Try 'sudo apt-get nvidia-settings' and see if it re-installs. FWIW though, it's not an essential package for the driver to work. The graphics system should work just fine without it until you work out the glitch.

Also, Aedan is right about using the distro's version of the driver. This is the 'package manager-aware method', and for you is the safest. I have been there, too, with the .sh/.run files straight from the Nvidia site, and I eventually worked out a system to update in a fairly painless fashion, but DKMS and the distro version driver is much, much easier. Remember that anything you install outside of the package manager isn't 'registered' with the PM, so you have to update it manually. That means, 'by hand', as you have found out. Also, with DKMS, you shouldn't get a broken graphics system when you update the kernel. After you reboot into a new kernel version, DKMS will take over and automatically install the river for the new kernel. It works well. I can't remember ever having problems with it, and my kernel in aptosid gets updated on a monthly basis.

Even in Gentoo, where we do lots of things manually, I use the package manager for the Nvidia driver. It only requires that the /usr/src/linux symlink is pointing to the kernel in use. After configuring and building a new kernel version, I update the kernel/blob with a small utility that rebuilds the kernel modules. And that's it.

Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh(or .run) files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

booman 22nd September, 2012 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519613)
Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

Thats funny because I always got them to work better in Linux. Specially Fedora.
I'm using Mint 13 too and have not tried a manual installation.



You should be able to install Nvidia drivers with these steps:

Step 1 ? download drivers:
Download the R302.11 drivers from nvidia
NVIDIA-Linux-x86-304.43.run
(I rename it to something easy like nvidia.run)

Step 2 ? Stopping the display manager / X-server:
Open a shell with [Ctrl+Alt+F1].
Under Mint 13, the display manager is called mdm (Mint Display Manager).
Here is a radical way to stop it:
Code:

sudo killall mdm
Step 3 ? Installation of the drivers:
navigate to where you downloaded the driver
Code:

cd /home/username/Downloads
then make nvidia.run executable
Code:

sudo chmod +x nividia.run
execute it
Code:

sudo nvidia.run
Follow Nvidia prompts, agreeing to licenses... I said "OK" to all of them

Step 4 ? Reboot the system:
Code:

sudo reboot
Step 5 ? Check your drivers
Open a terminal and type:
Code:

nvidia-settings
______________________________________________
Remove Nvidia drivers:

Remove Nvidia drivers from the "Additional Drivers" interface.
or
Open a Terminal:
Code:

apt remove nvidia-current nvidia-settings
(If you installed a specific version this may be different but will still begin nvidia-)

ThunderRd 22nd September, 2012 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by booman (Post 519616)
Thats funny because I always got them to work better in Linux.

After I learned how, I had only an occasional problem as well. My advice here was for Daniel. With his special needs the process could be quite difficult to get right. I think the package manager route is best for him, although maybe not for you, if you want the cutting edge drivers.

Aedan 22nd September, 2012 06:20 PM

Iit sounds like you've got the drivers installed just fine, but the control panel app isn't quite so happy - that's good, but not great (given you can see the screen!). It may be possible to start it by starting a commandline and typing "nvidia-settings".

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 07:07 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519613)
I don't know what you mean by the app Nvidia-Xserver. Are you referring rather to the Nvidia settings manager?

My Debian lingo has gone a little bit by the wayside, but IIRC the settings manager is called simply 'nvidia-settings'. Try 'sudo apt-get nvidia-settings' and see if it re-installs. FWIW though, it's not an essential package for the driver to work. The graphics system should work just fine without it until you work out the glitch.

Also, Aedan is right about using the distro's version of the driver. This is the 'package manager-aware method', and for you is the safest. I have been there, too, with the .sh files straight from the Nvidia site, and I eventually worked out a system to update in a fairly painless fashion, but DKMS and the distro version driver is much, much easier. Remember that anything you install outside of the package manager isn't 'registered' with the PM, so you have to update it manually. That means, 'by hand', as you have found out. Also, with DKMS, you shouldn't get a broken graphics system when you update the kernel. After you reboot into a new kernel version, DKMS will take over and automatically install the river for the new kernel. It works well. I can't remember ever having problems with it, and my kernel in aptosid gets updated on a monthly basis.

Even in Gentoo, where we do lots of things manually, I use the package manager for the Nvidia driver. It only requires that the /usr/src/linux symlink is pointing to the kernel in use. After configuring and building a new kernel version, I update the kernel/blob with a small utility that rebuilds the kernel modules. And that's it.

Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh(or .run) files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

I did a restore and took the day off yesterday.

Here's the app in question back with the 295.49 driver,

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 07:26 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Hi Boo, TR, Aedan, You enrich me every day!

I can't tell how reassuring it is to have you guys show up with possible courses of action for me to take!

How some ever Aedan showed up first. As I realize that when I ask for help it creates an involvement and a stake in the solution, I try to stick with the one what brought me to the dance...At lest until the music stops.":O}

But please don't stop showing up on that account! LOL

Here we go again! ":O}

Repeating Aedan's instructions of yesterday, I will add the last "Nvidia settings"

Now, before re-boot and if that doesn't work, after I reboot.

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 07:40 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Once again we have success, drivers installed. And Nvidia Settings is still with us. (see pic). I'll keep an eye out during the day as see if we lose it again. If we do I'll apply Aidan's remedy and report back here. Many thanks! ":O}

What I really want from Nvidia settings are the adaptive settings...and just to know my systems "Right".

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 09:31 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Ok, how worried should I be? Take a look at the adaptive settings, It should top off at something like 1400, Chips vary. But 3500 seem out of the question for this card....Funny didn't do this yesterday did it? See First pic of Nvidia Settings)

Wonder what happened this time? At lest she idles nice and cool! Very quite as well,.... Suggestions?

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519613)
I don't know what you mean by the app Nvidia-Xserver. Are you referring rather to the Nvidia settings manager?

My Debian lingo has gone a little bit by the wayside, but IIRC the settings manager is called simply 'nvidia-settings'. Try 'sudo apt-get nvidia-settings' and see if it re-installs. FWIW though, it's not an essential package for the driver to work. The graphics system should work just fine without it until you work out the glitch.

Also, Aedan is right about using the distro's version of the driver. This is the 'package manager-aware method', and for you is the safest. I have been there, too, with the .sh files straight from the Nvidia site, and I eventually worked out a system to update in a fairly painless fashion, but DKMS and the distro version driver is much, much easier. Remember that anything you install outside of the package manager isn't 'registered' with the PM, so you have to update it manually. That means, 'by hand', as you have found out. Also, with DKMS, you shouldn't get a broken graphics system when you update the kernel. After you reboot into a new kernel version, DKMS will take over and automatically install the river for the new kernel. It works well. I can't remember ever having problems with it, and my kernel in aptosid gets updated on a monthly basis.

Even in Gentoo, where we do lots of things manually, I use the package manager for the Nvidia driver. It only requires that the /usr/src/linux symlink is pointing to the kernel in use. After configuring and building a new kernel version, I update the kernel/blob with a small utility that rebuilds the kernel modules. And that's it.

Bottom line: stay away from the Nvidia-provided .sh(or .run) files. Although they do work fine for the most part, they are more headache to learn to install than they are worth, and all you gain is a slightly more current driver version.

Some great advice and I'm all ears! Other than using the "Additional drivers" app in Mint I can't imagine it being easier than 4 lines of code. Thank you for taking the time to elaborate my choices for me and I think your advocacy is correct, I'm an Easy kinda guy! ":O}

I've re-booted several times and Nvidia Settings is still with us...So I think Aedan's last line "nvidia-settings" Before I closed and rebooted did the trick.

booman 22nd September, 2012 11:17 PM

I"m glad you got it working Dan!
I never trust the Nvidia driver for the specs anyways.
The true test is your frame rates in game!

booman 22nd September, 2012 11:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519626)
After I learned how, I had only an occasional problem as well. My advice here was for Daniel. With his special needs the process could be quite difficult to get right. I think the package manager route is best for him, although maybe not for you, if you want the cutting edge drivers.

I absolutely agree!
I've done it 30 times before finally understanding how to do it.
I even needed Katains help via ssh cause I couldn't get my ATI drivers install in Fedora 8 with an old Radeon 9600 Pro.... what a mess

The hardest part is troubleshooting when it doesn't work!!!:banghead::crazy:

Daniel ~ 22nd September, 2012 11:24 PM

3 Attachment(s)
At lest it properly IDs my card! ":O}

295.49 drivers said my top Ram was speed was 1400 as I know nothing about current DDR 5 ram speeds is it possible the 295's mis reported my top Ram speed and it now correctly reports under 304.48 drivers?

Here's what the Details section at new egg says ...I'm REALLY not understanding these numbers are different things being measured here? Or am I screwed somehow?

Learn more about the EVGA 02G-P4-2678-KR
Model

Brand
EVGA

Model
02G-P4-2678-KR

Interface

Interface
PCI Express 3.0 x16

Chipset

Chipset Manufacturer
NVIDIA

GPU
GeForce GTX 670

Core Clock
1006MHz

Boost Clock
1084MHz

CUDA Cores
1344

Memory

Effective Memory Clock
6208MHz

Memory Size
2GB

Memory Interface
256-bit

Memory Type
GDDR5

3D API

DirectX
DirectX 11

OpenGL
OpenGL 4.2

Ports

HDMI
1 x HDMI

DisplayPort
1 x DisplayPort

DVI
2 x DVI

General

RAMDAC
400 MHz

Max Resolution
2560 x 1600 (DL-DVI)

3D VISION Game Ready
Yes

SLI Support
SLI Ready

Cooler
With Fan

System Requirements
Minimum of a 500 Watt power supply. (Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 30 Amps.)

Power Connector
2 x 6 Pin

Dual-Link DVI Supported
Yes

HDCP Ready
Yes

Card Dimensions
10" x 4.38"

Features

Features
NVIDIA PhysX technology

NVIDIA SMX Engine

NVIDIA GPU Boost

NVIDIA Adaptive Vertical Sync

NVIDIA Surround

Supports four concurrent displays

NVIDIA 3D Vision Ready

NVIDIA CUDA Technology

NVIDIA FXAA Technology

NVIDIA TXAA Technology

NVIDIA PureVideo HD Technology


Comments PLEASE!

ThunderRd 23rd September, 2012 05:10 AM

It is possible that sometime between the 295 driver and the 304 driver the code was updated for the GTX670.

I did not see the specs you are referring to previously, but I don't see anything strange there now. All the clock numbers in your text are correct for that GPU. I think you're good to go.

I am smelling a boost to the folding team in the works...when you are settled down, let's make that biatch do some number crunching :)

Daniel ~ 23rd September, 2012 06:36 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I'm Sorry TR when I went back I realized that I had not post a pic of the Clock and Memory numbers.

I "thought" this GPU was to have a minimum of Core Clock 1006MHz with a minimum Boost Clock of 1084MHz...Mine was 14 something under 395 drivers. Now it reports half my Graphics and twice my RAM ....Well look...":O}

ThunderRd 23rd September, 2012 11:08 AM

That screenshot is showing the throttled settings under PowerMizer.

Turn it off to see the unthrottled numbers. I don't use PowerMizer because the box is always folding. If you're not going to fold with the GPU then you can save a bit on the electric bill with it.

booman 23rd September, 2012 04:25 PM

Also, that GUI may need to refresh. Clocking speeds aren't always "locked" real-time, just like in CPUZ for Windows. You can see the numbers changing because its always refreshing.
Look for a refresh button/menu or just launch it again... maybe that would help.
Also, try Crysis 2 again... is it running better?
Frome time to time newegg.com has had mistakes with specs. Read the comments about the card too and see if anyone else has had that problem.
One last thing... do your research first, but the BIOS may need to be updated, just a thought

Daniel ~ 23rd September, 2012 07:45 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ThunderRd (Post 519657)
That screenshot is showing the throttled settings under PowerMizer.

Turn it off to see the unthrottled numbers. I don't use PowerMizer because the box is always folding. If you're not going to fold with the GPU then you can save a bit on the electric bill with it.

I think we may be up against the NEW again...When I turn off thermal and Power Miser I'm stuck at minimum settings. I can't find anything else to turn off. My Ram speed shouldn't be twice what it capable of around 1.4, My MAX Graphics is Half what it should be, even at max performance.Even with Thermal and Power M. turned off.

Daniel ~ 23rd September, 2012 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by booman (Post 519659)
Also, that GUI may need to refresh. Clocking speeds aren't always "locked" real-time, just like in CPUZ for Windows. You can see the numbers changing because its always refreshing.
Look for a refresh button/menu or just launch it again... maybe that would help.
Also, try Crysis 2 again... is it running better?
Frome time to time newegg.com has had mistakes with specs. Read the comments about the card too and see if anyone else has had that problem.
One last thing... do your research first, but the BIOS may need to be updated, just a thought

Restarted and rebooted several times. Cry two looks much better, But does NOT recognize my card, I still get the same message but now it says my card is a 8300 GS.

Cry 2 when I set to optimal drops me down to the lowest setting, still won't play, but the cut scenes look very good. I'm checking everywhere!

Cry one wants to bump my card to the bottom as well. Half life looks and plays better than ever. These numbers just are not right!

booman 23rd September, 2012 11:56 PM

yeah, something is weird. I'm guessing those drivers aren't ready yet.
Were they beta?

Daniel ~ 24th September, 2012 01:11 AM

Nope. Aedan showed me how to download Current Drivers.... I ran Furmarks and FluidMarks, both properly ID my Card... I'm a slow reader as most everything is new and requires me to think or research or both...

Code:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings
nvidia-settings


Daniel ~ 24th September, 2012 01:24 AM

Just ran it again and it just said my drivers were current...it might have added, current but crappy...I think Ill look into going back to the 295 for a while... though that really wasn't any better other than getting my core and ram speeds right.

booman 24th September, 2012 01:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel ~ (Post 519679)
Just ran it again and it just said my drivers were current...it might have added, current but crappy...I think Ill look into going back to the 295 for a while... though that really wasn't any better other than getting my core and ram speeds right.

That could make all the difference!
I've never had problems with driver versions in Windows, but who knows how much these are tested in Linux

Aedan 24th September, 2012 11:05 AM

Your memory clock looks like it might well be showing the correct figure, given that the memory bus on the card is DDR (double data rate), so clocks on both the rising and falling edges - the clock would therefore be half the transfer rate.

Back in April, Phoronix raised an issue that nvidia-settings wasn't reporting core clock speed correctly - see here .

Daniel ~ 24th September, 2012 06:54 PM

Thank you Aedan, I'm on my way! ":O}

Well much has been gained by reading at Toms!!

1. First and of course foremost...This is not my fault!
2. This is not me alone!
3. Nvidia has been aware of this since April!
4. The fix is on the way.
5 Almost as important as number 1, the card is "probably" running fine, just misreporting.
6. Given the above is it any wonder all my new games see my card as insult to their code!

I found something, but as per usual can't re-find it. It seems that the 2600K isn't really completely up on PCIe 3....

But I was researching something else and then could not find my way back...I need better search skills!

booman 24th September, 2012 07:10 PM

it really sucks when you have all the excitement of a new video card and don't get the plug-n-play you want to run it.

A few years back I totally gave up on Linux and gaming because I couldn't get the video drivers to work.

Now its just a few steps, not without its problems, but usually pretty easy.

I would still say Linux is more optimized for older hardware.
Mint 13 is running great on my 6 month old hardware, but I originally had a LOT of problems.

I'm hoping from here on I will have a lot of success because in terms of computer advances... my computer is already obsolete!

Daniel ~ 24th September, 2012 07:17 PM

So is mine! But your not mega bucks in the hole for yours!":O}

booman 24th September, 2012 07:47 PM

True. Honestly I wouldn't purchase a video card for $400 because the $200 works just fine for me.
Don't worry, it will work in time...
I've always wondered about new hardware and the software catching up... kinda like playing the Vista game!

Daniel ~ 24th September, 2012 08:02 PM

I can remember getting poor drivers from Nividia long ago and going after-market on Drivers, there were some good free lance driver makers out there, probably still are! ":O}

Boo.... How to say this... we are at different stages of life. Your raising a family and assiduously pursuing your career and livelihood.

Boo...this might well be my last build... it seems unlikely, but so does one's own death.":O}

This by far the most advanced, for it's time, machine I've ever built . It was now or perhaps never... and it will most likely be 5 years before I could do this again...if at all...

booman 24th September, 2012 08:11 PM

6 years ago I would always go ATI or Nvidia for drivers in XP.
But I found a Radeon 9800 SE that could be unlocked to a Radon 9800 Pro, but I had to use special drivers.
After a bunch of research I found: OmegaDrivers.net | ATI/NVIDIA Omega Driver's Home, PC Gaming Drivers & News!


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:40 PM.


Copyright ©2001 - 2010, AOA Forums


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0