AOA Forums

AOA Forums (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/index.php)
-   Linux (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=120)
-   -   Mint 14 released... already? (http://www.aoaforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=50947)

Daniel ~ 22nd November, 2012 08:54 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Well looks like I'll be moving to 64 bit Mint 14 after all! ":O}

Naturally I'll try setting up one or two games to confirm mint 14 worthiness.. before moving the show to the big tent! ":O}

I'm having fun I hope you all are as well!":O}

chrisbard 23rd November, 2012 12:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel ~ (Post 521729)
I'm having fun I hope you all are as well!":O}

Glad to hear it, yeah I am enjoying a glass of wine and playing some games that don't even require to be installed on my XBOX! :) God I feel so shallow! :rolling:

Daniel ~ 23rd November, 2012 02:12 AM

Crysis 2 plays much better! I would say a 50 -60% crash reduction. Plays beautifully as always, but still crashes for no apparent reason, hard crashes the kind they put power off button on the computer for...

But it IS remarkably better! ":O}

Daniel ~ 23rd November, 2012 02:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisbard (Post 521730)
Glad to hear it, yeah I am enjoying a glass of wine and playing some games that don't even require to be installed on my XBOX! :) God I feel so shallow! :rolling:

The holidays are made for shallow! ":O}

booman 23rd November, 2012 04:03 AM

I thought you did this before with Mint 13 64-bit?
Anyways, I'm glad its updated and those stinking 32-bit libraries are installed.

Aedan 23rd November, 2012 10:36 AM

This is one of the things that winds me up a bit. How does it help the end user to have a package management system that knows that the 32bit stuff isn't installed, but refuse to install it? Yet, that very same package management system has the ability to install it!

Given Mint releases a new version every 6 months, it seems slightly crazy to have to go through all of this every time there's a new version!

Daniel ~ 23rd November, 2012 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by booman (Post 521637)
It should be as simple as this:
Code:

sudo cp /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.bak
sudo sed -i ?s/lisa/maya/g? /etc/apt/sources.list
sudo sed -i ?s/oneiric/precise/g? /etc/apt/sources.list
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get autoremove
sudo apt-get autoclean

From a forum post upgrading 12 to 13

Had a chanch to try this yet Boo?

booman 24th November, 2012 02:47 PM

Yes, did it last night...
Took an hour or two because it would stop and ask if I want to keep a package or over-write it.... but I didn't know it was waiting for my human intervention.
So I would check it, type "I" and then it would continue.... then it would happen again.
Maybe this is why I can't get internet on my Mint 14?

Anyways, everything seems to have worked pretty good.
The first boot gave me an error, but then I set up Cinnamon to be the default and it works just like Mint 13.

My only problem is that I can't get internet for some reason.
I have a valid IP address set by my router, I can ping the router, but no internet.

When I go to Preferences|Network Tools, the local device defaults to loopback interface (lo)
I can select the menu and choose my eth1 network device. I can configure it too.
I've tried setting manual, DHCP and DHCP (addresses) and manually adding the DNS addresses.
I can even ping the modem but no stinking internet????

Does anyone have an idea why Mint 14 would not give me internet?

Daniel ~ 24th November, 2012 07:59 PM

I wish I did kido. But you'll have to wait for someone who does...

or as we say in my country...BUMP!

Daniel ~ 24th November, 2012 09:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 521740)
This is one of the things that winds me up a bit. How does it help the end user to have a package management system that knows that the 32bit stuff isn't installed, but refuse to install it? Yet, that very same package management system has the ability to install it!

Given Mint releases a new version every 6 months, it seems slightly crazy to have to go through all of this every time there's a new version!

And why leave out wine? What sense does that make? Does it make it easier to update from one version to the next?

What's wanted, in my view, is a out of the box experience for the first time user. That's only way we will keep them...if it works out of the box.

We've all had to many bad Linux experiences to have a great deal of patience with distros that can't connect to the web, or can't play a sound, or can't load video card drivers...

We should be past this, this is the basic starting point. In my View EVERY destro (desktop Destro for the masses) should be a beginners destro first and foremost, we need NEW USERS.

People love what is easy. People love what is simple. Give them that and you can pile on anything else you like. So long as using it is simple, makes enjoying it easy.":O}

Aedan 25th November, 2012 10:58 AM

Wine wasn't missing - it was all the support code (32bit libraries) needed for it to function.

According to Mint, some of their reasons for success are:
  1. It works out of the box, with full multimedia support and is extremely easy to use.
  2. It's both free of cost and open source.
  3. It's community-driven. Users are encouraged to send feedback to the project so that their ideas can be used to improve Linux Mint.
  4. Based on Debian and Ubuntu, it provides about 30,000 packages and one of the best software managers.
  5. It's safe and reliable. Thanks to a conservative approach to software updates, a unique Update Manager and the robustness of its Linux architecture, Linux Mint requires very little maintenance (no regressions, no antivirus, no anti-spyware...etc).

I think experience has managed to disprove reason #1, and reason #5 is highly dubious for any OS.

chrisbard 25th November, 2012 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 521800)
I think experience has managed to disprove reason #1, and reason #5 is highly dubious for any OS.

...while 2,3,4 aren't exactly positive points? :D

booman 25th November, 2012 05:07 PM

Those are positive points for me!
The only reason Wine still exists is because of the community and its totally free.
Since it runs in Ubuntu and Debian it runs great in Mint too.

Aedan, do you have any tips on troubleshooting my networking problem in Mint 14?

I have a feeling something was changed to default my network device to lo instead of eth1
I'll keep doing some research, but if you have any pointers I would love to try em

Daniel ~ 25th November, 2012 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aedan (Post 521800)
Wine wasn't missing - it was all the support code (32bit libraries) needed for it to function.

According to Mint, some of their reasons for success are:
  1. It works out of the box, with full multimedia support and is extremely easy to use.
  2. It's both free of cost and open source.
  3. It's community-driven. Users are encouraged to send feedback to the project so that their ideas can be used to improve Linux Mint.
  4. Based on Debian and Ubuntu, it provides about 30,000 packages and one of the best software managers.
  5. It's safe and reliable. Thanks to a conservative approach to software updates, a unique Update Manager and the robustness of its Linux architecture, Linux Mint requires very little maintenance (no regressions, no antivirus, no anti-spyware...etc).

I think experience has managed to disprove reason #1, and reason #5 is highly dubious for any OS.

What bothers me is they use to mean it! They lagged behind to insure that everything worked and it pretty much did at lest for me.

Now it seems they are more interested in being the cutting edge... Let's hope they can find a happy medium.

Gizmo 25th November, 2012 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by booman (Post 521806)
Those are positive points for me!
The only reason Wine still exists is because of the community and its totally free.
Since it runs in Ubuntu and Debian it runs great in Mint too.

Aedan, do you have any tips on troubleshooting my networking problem in Mint 14?

I have a feeling something was changed to default my network device to lo instead of eth1
I'll keep doing some research, but if you have any pointers I would love to try em

It sounds to me like your default gateway is set to 127.0.0.1 (which would go to lo). If that's the case, you'll need to change that to correspond with your IP address settings (DHCP, or the gateway for your network if using static addressing). I've no idea how to tell you to do that in Mint.

Daniel ~ 25th November, 2012 07:40 PM

Gizmo:

I know you have to be away much of the time, but I just have to say how good it is to see you posting...just like in the old days...":O}

booman 26th November, 2012 03:04 AM

Quote:

It sounds to me like your default gateway is set to 127.0.0.1 (which would go to lo). If that's the case, you'll need to change that to correspond with your IP address settings (DHCP, or the gateway for your network if using static addressing). I've no idea how to tell you to do that in Mint.
I know how to do it in the GUI but something seems to be over-riding it. Like a .conf file
Do you know what .conf files may have this information?

Gizmo 26th November, 2012 09:07 AM

In RH systems, it would be in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth*

On Gentoo systems, it would be in /etc/conf.d/net

For Mint and Debian systems, I haven't a clue.

Gizmo 26th November, 2012 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel ~ (Post 521817)
Gizmo:

I know you have to be away much of the time, but I just have to say how good it is to see you posting...just like in the old days...":O}

Glad I can bring sunshine to someone's day. ;)

chrisbard 26th November, 2012 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gizmo (Post 521828)
Glad I can bring sunshine to someone's day. ;)

ME too! :rolling:


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:51 AM.


Copyright ©2001 - 2010, AOA Forums


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0